The Daily Footnote
SO

For the past few days, I’ve been doing a social media blackout with my small group. And at the end of it, instead of feeling super relieved and excited to return to the world of Instagram and Twitter, I felt like God was saying “hey, stretch a little more.” I grew up in a very non-traditional church tradition, and so I’ve never actually participated in Lent, but this year seems like a perfect time to fast something.

Which leads me to my reason for writing this post: I’m going to continue my social media blackout throughout the next 40 days! So you won’t see me here again until April 13, but don’t worry, I will be back! In the meantime, things I’m hoping to accomplish/move toward/create in the space that’s normally filled with my endless tumblr scroll:

  • Illustrate things. Be creative. Maybe start on a sequential project. 
  • Begin to care less about what people think on the internet. I find myself posting a lot of shit that just doesn’t need to be said, just because I want people to know I said it. Hashtag secret narcissist!
  • I’m hoping to get a lot of reading done, because I have an extensive list that I’ve barely put a dent into. 
  • And of course, I’m hoping to deepen my relationship with God through this. I feel like He wouldn’t have put it on my heart if there wasn’t something He wanted me to grow in or show me through it, so I’m excited and expectant for what the next month or so will bring! 

So yeah! If you have things that you need to tell me like omg immediately, text me (because if you have things you will need to tell me omg immediately, you probably have my number), and message me otherwise! See you guys in 40 days! 

I was remembering the other day

that I once had this illustration professor in college who was like “feet are literally impossible to draw!” 

And I regret immensely

that I did not say

in that moment

"Would you say it’s an impossible feat?

scottlava:

“She’s not just a computer.”
OSCARS WEEK: Day 4

scottlava:

She’s not just a computer.”

OSCARS WEEK: Day 4

moofrog:

So my Children’s Books teacher mentioned publishers are less interested in digital art that looks “too” digital. Here are my attempts at “less digital” art…with textured brushes~ Hope I achieved my goal. :O
This is an illustration to the Aesop’s Fable: The Lion and the Mouse

This is ADORABLE

moofrog:

So my Children’s Books teacher mentioned publishers are less interested in digital art that looks “too” digital. Here are my attempts at “less digital” art…with textured brushes~ Hope I achieved my goal. :O

This is an illustration to the Aesop’s Fable: The Lion and the Mouse

This is ADORABLE

skribleskrable:

My Disney quest continues! Still not as Disneyish as I wanted. Guess I’ll have to keep trying!

skribleskrable:

My Disney quest continues! Still not as Disneyish as I wanted. Guess I’ll have to keep trying!

lastofthetimeladies:

#THAT’S ANDREW GARFIELD RIGHT BEHIND HER #CLAPPING LIKE A TWO-YEAR-OLD

MORE IMPORTANTLY: she is not even PRETEND-laughing at that horrible joke. I love it. 

As an actress, I realize that viewers are entitled to have whatever feelings they want about the characters they watch. But as a human being, I’m concerned that so many people react to Skyler with such venom. Could it be that they can’t stand a woman who won’t suffer silently or “stand by her man”? That they despise her because she won’t back down or give up? Or because she is, in fact, Walter’s equal? But I finally realized that most people’s hatred of Skyler had little to do with me and a lot to do with their own perception of women and wives. Because Skyler didn’t conform to a comfortable ideal of the archetypical female, she had become a kind of Rorschach test for society, a measure of our attitudes toward gender.”

-Anna Gunn, “I Have A Character Issue”

"…Refusing to serve gay and lesbian people, and advancing legislation that denies others their civil liberties in response to perceived threats to our own, does irreparable damage to our witness as Christians and leaves a whole group of people feeling like second-class citizens, not only in our country, but also in the Kingdom [of God]. There may be second-class citizens in the U.S. and in Uganda and in Russia, but there should be no second-class citizens in the Kingdom.

As I’ve made it clear in the past, I support marriage equality and affirm my gay and lesbian friends who want to commit themselves to another person for life. But even if I didn’t, even if I believed same-sex marriage was a sin, I could never, in good conscience, throw my support behind a law that would put my gay and lesbian neighbors behind bars for being gay or allow businesses to discriminate against them because of their orientation.

Because over and beyond my beliefs regarding homosexuality is my most deeply-held conviction that I am called to love my neighbor as myself…even if it costs me something, even if it means walking a second mile.”

Senate Bill 1062 does not address a specific and present concern related to religious liberty in Arizona. I have not heard of one example in Arizona where a business owner’s religious liberty has been violated.

The bill is broadly worded and could result in unintended and negative consequences.

After weighing all of the arguments, I vetoed Senate Bill 1062 moments ago.

To the supporters of the legislation, I want you to know that I understand that long-held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before.

Our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. However, I sincerely believe that Senate Bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve.

It could divide Arizona in ways we cannot even imagine and no one would ever want.

Religious liberty is a core American and Arizona value. So is non-discrimination.

Republican governor JAN BREWER, vetoing SB 1062, which would have allowed businesses to discriminate against customers based solely on sexual orientation.

She vetoed it, yes.  But read the language in her veto letter and take it for what it’s worth: Brewer and others like her continuing to put the “definition” of marriage before the issue of civil and human rights.

(via The Arizona Republic)

So glad to hear this got vetoed.